Ellen Gallager, Bird in Hand

Syllabus: Intermediate Drawing

I have learned that what I have not drawn, I have never really seen…

Frederick Franck

Course Description:

Building on the skills gained in Introduction to Drawing, this course is designed to further your observational drawing abilities while also helping you develop an expanded sense of what drawing can be. Starting from the simple line drawings and evolving into experiments with mixed media and sculptural drawing, your task will be to hone your drawing skills while also beginning to develop a sense of what interests and sustains you as a drawer and as an artist more broadly. You will be asked to revisit and solidify your understanding of basics like value, perspective and composition and use those skills to create compelling and fully realized works of art that move beyond the fundamentals.

In tackling these tasks, you will combine visual thinking and drawing, allowing one to inform the other and using each to understand the other more thoroughly. Through revisiting and reconsidering foundational drawing skills you will expand your visual vocabulary, observing, responding to, reinterpreting and reinventing the world around you. Throughout this evolution, I will ask you to consider constantly the call and response between the artist and her or his environment, using a variety of senses and approaches to drive the art-making practice.

Class structure:

Each class period will begin with review and critique of the previous week’s homework, occasionally followed by a drawing-based warm up exercise. This will generally be followed by lecture/discussion/image viewing, introducing the new techniques and concepts that will be used in the upcoming exercises and homework assignment. The bulk of the class period will be devoted to studio time, including demonstration and discussion when necessary. Students are also expected to keep a sketchbook ,which should be filled with compositional studies, observations/notes on watercolor, doodles, texture samples etc.

COURSE WEBSITE: All assignments will be posted here in detail, so it is essential that students check the website regularly. Schedule and assignments listed here take precedence over the paper syllabus provided at the beginning of the semester.

Grades:

Class participation + attendance – 30%
Homework Assignments – 35%
Final Project + Portfolio Review – 25%
Sketchbook – 5%
Paper (exhibition review) – 5%

Extra Credit:

Several extra credit assignments will be offered throughout the semester, equal to around 5% of the total points possible in the course. Most likely these will be exhibitions or events, and will require a written response for credit.

Late work: Assignments must be turned in on time and critiqued with the class to receive full credit. Late work will be evaluated, but will loose credit accordingly (One letter grade/week). Work that is more than three weeks late will not be accepted without prior arrangement and exceptional circumstances. However, lateness of work will not affect the final portfolio grade, so it’s worth catching up if you fall behind!

Reminders:

Participation in discussions, studio time and critiques is a course requirement and will be included in your grade. By “participation”, I mean that you are alert, focused and responsive in relation to your work, your peers and me. Lateness, absences and lack of preparation for class activities will adversely affect your participation grade. More than three absences will result in a failing grade for the course. Attendance is taken at the beginning of each class, so if you arrive late it is your job to notify me so that you are not marked absent (without interrupting class, please). In summary, be resourceful, commit to your work, communicate with me and with your classmates and it will be a good semester!

Also: please keep all major assignments (in good condition!) through the course of the semester. Selected assignments will be reviewed as a group at the end of the semester.

Contacting me: Email is the best way to contact me outside of class time. Please also cc Laura, and include the course name (Intermediate Drawing) in the subject line of your email. Give me a full description of your question/issue in legible (not text message-style!) language. I will use the email address you provide in the survey form to communicate with you.

Finally, I am required to notify you that CUNY has a strict policy against academic dishonesty, including plagiarism. Any act of academic dishonesty will be dealt with by applying the most stringent penalties permitted. Cheating includes but is not limited to receiving help during exams and submitting homework without properly acknowledging persons who assisted you. Please review the Policy on Academic Integrity posted on the CUNY website with URL: http://www1.cuny.edu/portal_ur/content/2004/policies/image/policy.pdf

Course Learning Objectives:

  • Improved skills and facility in working from observation, including rendering mass, volume & perspective through multiple techniques, combining these elements to create an integrated work of art.
  • Employ the fundamentals of visual problem solving, including traditional compositional strategies and experimental approaches.
  • Develop personal artistic vision through explorations of individualized mark-making, content and aesthetic sensibility.
  • Appreciate the place of drawing (both experimental/expanded and traditional) in the artistic practice and the larger art world, both historically and in the contemporary moment.
  • Develop vocabulary and increased comfort level with discussing drawing in a critical setting, including ability to articulate one’s own approach and conceptual basis.
Ellie Irons
TA: Laura Schneider Introduction to Drawing

ART 22000, section 3AD
CCNY, Fall 2014
Wednesdays 9:00-11:50
Room CG-236
Office hours 1-2 pm Wednesdays
or by appointment

Contact:
ellie (at) ellieirons (dot) com (replace w/ "@" & ".")
schneider.laura07 (at) gmail (dot) com (replace w/ "@" & ".")

Course Schedule

Fall 2014

Week 1: Wednesday Sept 3rd Introduction/Expanded Drawing line quality
Week 2: Wednesday Sept 10th Essential Line contour and gesture drawing review
Week 3: Wednesday Sept 17th Meaning in Objects (Value and Still Life) Value studies, siting and foreshortening review
No Class September 24th
Week 4: Wednesday Oct 1st Meaning in Objects (Atmosphere, Mood) linear and atmospheric perspective
Week 5:Wednesday Oct 8th Texture/Surface/Pattern Texture as value, pattern grids
Week 6: Wednesday Oct 15th The Surreal (Scale, Composition, Spatial Relationships) Cross-hatching review
Week 7: Wednesday Oct 22nd Midterm Project: Portrait Series Portraiture: from life, photo
Week 8: Wednesday Oct 29th Midterm Project: Portrait Series Midterm checkins
Week 9: Wednesday Nov 5th Midterm Critiques Ink Experiments
Week 10: Wednesday Nov 12th Gallery Field Trip, details TBA
Week 11: Wednesday Nov 19th Imposing Obstructions/alternative grounds Guest artist
Week 12: Wednesday Nov 26th Drawing in Space/Liquid Media
Week 13: Wednesday Dec 3rd Final Project Workshop
Week 14: Wednesday Dec 10th Portfolios Due Final Project Check in
Week 15: Wed Dec 17th Final Project Presentations 10 am-12:00 pm* *Our official final slot is 8-10:15 am. If you have a conflict with 10 am-12:00 pm, let me know.

Supply List

A list of all supplies with specific items selected is available online from Blick.
Drawing Supplies

Other equipment

  • Cans or cups for wet media
  • Pencil Sharpener*
  • x-acto blade or small utility knife (for sharpening and trimming paper from sketchbook)*
  • Drawing Board Plain MDF Hardboard is cheap at also works great, just order some bulldog clips to go with it (for 18 x 24” paper)
  • Portfolio (at least 18 x 24”)
  • clips or masking tape for attaching paper to drawing boards*

Paper

Optional:

Apron, Drafting Brush, chamois, blending stubs, small clamp-on lamp (optional, helpful for getting good lighting on still life)

*required for Week 2 class

Week 13

Assignment 9 Crit/Final Project Workshop

  • Critique/Photograph Assignment 9
  • Portfolio Guidelines (portfolios due next Wed, 12/10)
  • Review final project proposals (small groups, Ellie + Laura)
  • Final project workshop/work time/individual meetings
  • Homework:

Week 12

Portraiture Week 3

  • Review/critique progress on Assignment 9: three portraits
  • Warmup: contour drawing in partners/by touch
  • Work time/individual meetings (final projects, missing assignments, current project)
  • Homework:
    1. Finish Assignment 9, come prepared to present it for crit on 12/3
    2. Proposal for Final Project due 12/3

Week 10

Portraiture

Week 9

Ink Experiments/Ink Collage

  • Homework Review: Assignment 6 (Texture-Pattern Map)
  • Large ink Value scale, ink wash experiments
  • Ink still life with portrait busts (value)
  • Group Ink Collage
  • Homework:
  • Assignment #8: Ink Collage Self Portrait

Week 8

Homework for Week 8
Since we didn’t get to go over some basic portraiture and ink handling information in class today, I’m going to have you warm up with ink over the next week by doing a series of gesture drawings with ink and a brush, and watching two videos on drawing from the figure: Week 8 Homework

**All the below will be pushed back to next week**

Ink Experiments/The Figure

  • Homework Review: Assignment 6 (Texture-Pattern Map)
  • Warm up: Gesture Drawing in Ink (figure studies)
  • Ink Value scale, ink wash experiments
  • Ink still life with portrait busts (value)
  • Homework:
  • Two self-portraits in ink emphasizing value: one from life (mirror), one from provided photograph (photos here)

Week 7

Texture/Pattern/Mapping

  • Homework Review: Cross-hatching still life, pattern grids
  • Pattern grid value scales?
  • Review sketchbook reading response
  • Demo: tracing and transfer
  • Begin Texture Map project
  • Extra Credit updated
  • Homework:
    • Finish Assignment 6: Texture-Pattern-Value Map
    • Bring ink supplies next week (round watercolor brush(es), India ink, cup for water, plastic palette if you have one, or I will supply plates)

Week 6

Texture/Pattern/Optical Grays

  • Homework Review: Assignment #4
  • Images: Cross-hatching/texture/pattern
  • Exercises: Cross-hatching soft & hard, pattern/texture as value
  • Homework:

Week 5

Meaning in Objects (Texture, Composition)

  • Homework Review: Assignment 3
  • Assignment 4 Plans/check in
  • Images: Max Ernst, Yashua Klos (pdf)
  • In class exercises:
    • Toning page/removing value
    • Frottage (rubbing to create texture)
    • White on black
  • Homework/Reading:
    • Complete Assignment 4
    • Finish Reading “What is Drawing?” article. Respond in your sketchbook: find a drawing mentioned in the text that interests you (research it online if necessary). Reproduce it in your sketchbook (simplified diagram w/ notes is fine). Write down the artist, title, medium, date and a paragraph about why the piece interests you.
    • Next week: bring a ballpoint pen (good quality, even ink flow, black) or $2 to buy one from me.

Week 4

Meaning in Objects (Atmosphere, Negative Space)

Week 3

Meaning in Objects (Value and Still Life)

  • Homework Review: Assignment #2, Room Panorama
  • Image viewing: Still Life
  • Demo/Handouts: Sighting/Proportion and Value review
  • Exercises
    • Thumbnail sketching/sighting exercises
    • Simple Value Studies
  • Homework and reading assignment

Week 2

Essential Line (Contour & Gesture Review)

Week 1

Introduction

Final Project

Your final project is an open media project in the form of your choice. It may include multiple drawings in a series, or a single large drawing. I will provide two 22 x 30″ sheets of drawing paper per student, which can be cut up, combined, collaged or used as is. You are not required to use the provided paper. The project can be executed however you see fit. There are no restrictions on content, theme, media or approach. If you need more structure or somewhere to start, consider the prompts below. Final project schedule is as follows:

Schedule

12/3: In class proposal due (sketches, written explanation in sketchbook, ready to share with class)
12/3: In class work session. Bring supplies to class to work on your project, small group meetings, individual meetings
12/10: In class work session, in-progress critique, (final portfolios due)
12/17: Present final project for final critiques, (final portfolios returned)

  1. Choose a quote or a line of poetry to work in response to. Don’t simply illustrate the text, but rather seek to express it visually through the mood, composition, texture, style etc of your piece.
  2. Choose a work of art from a museum collection to work in response to. Select your own subject matter, but use the artist’s style, media, technique and/or composition to push your work forward.
  3. Pick a political issue or historical event that you feel strongly about and create a drawing expresses how you feel about it. Again, don’t simply illustrate your subject, but rather find ways to convey the emotional power it holds for you.
  4. Create a drawing that can be read as a timeline of your life.
  5. Combine two genres in an unexpected way. Can you make a portrait that is also a landscape, a cartoon-y line drawing that incorporates classical atmospheric perspective or a drawing that reads as an advertisement or poster while including a subversive message?

Assignment #9: Three Portraits

Three Portraits

Instructions: Working from one of the provided photographs or another (high resolution, well-lit) photograph, create a series of three portraits of the same person using different approaches and/or techniques. You can abstract or modify the way you represent yourself/your subject, but the drawings you create should still have a strong physical resemblance and/or include areas that are realistically rendered.

Method: All three portraits are due December 3rd. There will be periodic in-progress critiques along the way. You must show significant progress during these critiques to receive full credit on the assignment. You should do a series of sketches, drafts and studies to determine what the media, technique and approach will be for each piece. You may work on the pieces sequentially, or on all three simultaneously. Possible media, techniques and approaches are listed below.

Schedule:

11/19: In-progress critique 1 with Laura
11/26: In-progress critique 2 with Laura and Ellie
12/3: Present three completed drawings for in-class critique

Possible options for media and technique:

  • Detailed contour drawing in pen, pencil or ink
  • Well-developed gesture drawing in pen, pencil or ink
  • Value drawing in ink, toned charcoal, charcoal or graphite
  • Value drawing in cross-hatching, stippling or other pattern/texture
  • Collage using ink, pen, pencil and/or found materials
  • Drawing using rubbing or other applied texture
  • Drawing incorporating a limited color palette (chalk pastel, colored pencil, collage)
  • Any combination of the above

Possible thematic or aesthetic approaches:

  • emphasizing aspects of negative space or flatness
  • playing with shifts in scale or perspective
  • realistic rendering juxtaposed against highly abstracted imagery
  • incorporating a pattern or design that provides meaning
  • using value/contrast relationships to create mood/atmosphere
  • found/collaged/appropriated materials that carry meaning
  • Any combination of the above

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Week 9 – Assignment #8

Ink Collage Self Portrait
Using the collage techniques explored in class, create an ink collage that fills your whole 18 x 24″ pad. You may work from one of the provided photos, or from a mirror. If you work from a mirror it’s important that you have a good range of darks and lights (dramatic lighting) so that you can interpret value using torn paper. You may also choose to paint lines and/or values on top of your collaged paper once you’ve applied it to the ground.

Portrait Photos are available on Dropbox here.

Examples:

Student work from University of Delaware:

collage-self-portraithttps://ohmyeyesandears.wordpress.com/category/drawing/

Student work from Deviant Art:
Self_Portrait_Collage_by_DodosConundrum

Student Work from CCNY:
14182495768_da2f7104f7_k

Week 8 – Assignment #7

Gesture In Ink
Since we didn’t get to go over some basic portraiture and ink handling information in class today, I’m going to have you warm up with ink over the next week by doing a series of gesture drawings with ink and a brush. If you’re new to ink, start by experimenting with a variety of lines and shapes to get familiar with how the brush holds and distributes ink.

Ink can be used similarly to pencil or pen to create fine lines, thick lines, or large areas of value, depending on how you manipulate your brush. You can also try working in light pencil first and then transition to ink. These drawings can be done both in your sketchbook and your 18 x 24″ pad. Scale is up to you, but try to do at least a few that activate a whole 18 x 24″ page. You can also do multiple per page, as in the Rembrandt example below.

Homework Instructions:

  1. First, refresh your memory on gesture and learn more about working with the figure by watching two short videos from Otis College: Gesture 1 and Gesture 2. Your drawings can be looser and less systematic than described here, but he makes some good points about the structure of the body and process.
  2. Do 20 Gesture Drawings using india ink and your large watercolor brush:
    • 5 people (whole body)
    • 5 heads (shoulders up is fine too)
    • 5 forms in motion (squirrels, birds, cars, people walking)
    • 5 your choice
  3. Bring your drawings to class on Wednesday, along with your ink supplies
  4. Examples:
    From “The Art Professor” blog:
    gesture1
    Rembrandt:
    rembrandt-study-sick-woman
    study
    Matisse:
    matissecontour

Week 7- Assignment #6

Texture-Pattern-Value Map

Using textures and values inspired by the texture pattern grid project, create a black and white map of your selected region in ball point pen. Begin by transferring your map to 11 x 14″ bristol using tracing paper and graphite. Give the whole composition a frame, leaving at least a 1″ border around the edges. Experiment with different textures in your sketchbook (or use your texture squares) to see how different textures and values look next to each other. Come up with a plan for how you will lay out your textures and values to create a striking, legible design for your map. For your completed design, try to fill the bulk of the map with value and texture, using the white of the page for balance and contrast, but not as a main texture or value. Basic steps below:

  1. Begin by transferring your map to 11 x 13″ bristol using tracing paper and graphite.
  2. eirons-2013-03-13-3892
    eirons-2013-03-13-3897

  3. Add at least 1 inch border around the edge of your page.
  4. Experiment with textures, values and patterns in your sketchbook to see how they look together. Use your texture squares to juxtapose different textures, values and patters.
  5. Come up with a plan for how you will lay out your textures and values to create a striking, legible design for your map. Lay out the patterns/textures you will use in very light pencil, so you have a plan to follow as you begin drawing.
  6. Fill in your patterns with ballpoint pen, creating a series of divisions between the different locations/territories/regions on your map through shifts in value, texture and pattern.
  7. photo-1

  8. For your completed drawing, try to fill the bulk of the map with value and texture, using the white of the page for balance and contrast, but not as a main texture or value.

Week 6: Assignment #5

Texture Grid

Handout with instructions

Screen Shot 2014-10-14 at 7.51.48 AM

Week 4: Assignment #4

Object Portrait 2 or Small Objects Large

*Choose one of the two assignments below to do for your next project. Whichever you select, it should be done on your 18 x 24″ drawing paper using vine charcoal/toned page technique or white chalk on black paper

**In progress sketches/plans are due in class next week 10/8, and I will demo possible techniques for the rest of the project in class that day

Object Portrait 2

Based on in-class feedback as well as techniques and concepts introduced this week (atmospheric perspective, negative space) make a new version of your object portrait that differs significantly from the first version. You should still render the objects using value in a way that creates a sense of volume and depth on your picture plane. If you choose, you may be more subjective about how you portray the objects or the relationships between them. You might shift the scale relationships between them, create flat areas of negative space in or between them, or heighten or diminish value contrast to create a sense of atmospheric perspective, or just change your composition so that we see your objects in a different way.

  1. Arrange your objects as before, with a good light source and the potential for extended observation.
  2. Create a series of compositional sketches exploring new possibilities for arranging your objects on the picture plane. You should also experiment with other alterations at this stage, like scale or negative space relationships, which might require a few quick value studies as well.
  3. When you have a clear plan for your finished piece, switch to your 18 x 24″ drawing pad and tone the page with vine charcoal as we did in class, leaving a border around the edges of your composition. If you choose to, you can tape off this border with masking tape to keep the edges cleaner. Otherwise just clean it later with a kneaded eraser.
  4. From here, proceed as we did in class and on previous value drawings: draw out your general diagrammatic lines in light vine charcoal marks until you are sure about the location of the objects (rub your charcoal to a point on scratch paper if it’s helpful). Gradually add in more specific structural lines, then start looking for major areas of light and dark. Use your kneaded eraser to pull out quarter tones and highlights, and your vine charcoal to build up base tones and cast shadows. (diagram below)
  5. When you’ve finished your drawing, clean the border with a kneaded eraser (and/or carefully/gently remove the masking tape) and cover it with a second piece of paper secured with paper clips or tape, so that it won’t slide around. This will help prevent smudging and smearing until you can spray it with fixative (available in class).
  6. When you come to class, bring your compositional studies and plans for the piece along with the finished piece.

Small Objects Large

This assignment is designed to help you continue to develop your observational and value rendering abilities while considering composition and negative space. Using the provided objects and one additional item of your choice, create a still life drawing in which you enlarge the objects to at least 2 times their actual size. Enlarging the objects will force you to look very closely at the light/shadow relationships on the surface as you build your value relationships. You should try to find ways to create interesting negative shapes among the objects and between the objects and the edges of your picture plane.

  1. Arrange your objects as before, with a good light source and the potential for extended observation.
  2. Create a series of compositional sketches exploring new possibilities for arranging your objects on the picture plane. Remember that the objects need to be enlarged, so in your compositional sketches they should fill a large part of the picture plane.
  3. When you have a clear plan for your finished piece, switch to your 18 x 24″ drawing pad and tone the page with vine charcoal as we did in class, leaving a border around the edges of your composition. If you choose to, you can tape off this border with masking tape to keep the edges cleaner. Otherwise just clean it later with a kneaded eraser.

  4. From here, proceed as we did in class and on previous value drawings: draw out your general diagrammatic lines in light vine charcoal marks until you are sure about the location of the objects (rub your charcoal to a point on scratch paper if it’s helpful). Gradually add in more specific structural lines, then start looking for major areas of light and dark. Use your kneaded eraser to pull out quarter tones and highlights, and your vine charcoal to build up base tones and cast shadows. (diagram below)
  5. When you’ve finished your drawing, clean the border with a kneaded eraser (and/or carefully/gently remove the masking tape) and cover it with a second piece of paper secured with paper clips or tape, so that it won’t slide around. This will help prevent smudging and smearing until you can spray it with fixative (available in class).
  6. When you come to class, bring your compositional studies and plans for the piece along with the finished piece.

Week 3: Assignment #3

1. Reading

2. Assignment: Object Portrait 1

**Complete at least steps #1-3 before next class**

For this project, you will be creating a drawing that functions as portrait but does not include a human figure. Rather, you will select two or three objects that represent a particular person or character in a metaphorical way. Your subject could be a family member or friend or a figure from history, literature or the media. It could even be yourself. The important thing is that you need to be able to gather actual objects that somehow represent that person and render them them as a value drawing, from life. You do not need to disclose who the drawing represents, but you may if you choose to. This project will be done mostly outside of class time, but we will have one in class session to review progress, so try to pick objects that will not be impossible to bring to class.

A few tips:

  • If rendering objects using value is new to you, think about picking fairly simple objects with uniform color and a fairly light local color (a pile of sugar cubes, a pale blue ceramic coffee cup, a clove of garlic…). This will make it easier to see and represent light and shadow.
  • If value drawing and still life are familiar to you, think about how you can challenge yourself. Are there objects or situations that might be more interesting or unusual for you to draw? How can you expand your own conception of what a still life drawing can be?
    • DIRECTIONS:
      Do #1-3 at home in the next two weeks, and bring your objects to class on 10/1 to continue with value. Optional: Complete #4-7 at home, if you’d like to get ahead. You should still bring your objects to class. If it’s impossible to bring your objects, bring a high res photo.

      1. After you’ve selected your objects, choose a good place to set them up for prolonged observation. Try to eliminate extraneous information from the setting. Anything that you see around the objects should be included in the drawing, so if it doesn’t add meaning, eliminate it. Putting your objects inside an opened up cardboard box or against a white sheet could be a good idea. If you know you’ll need to move your set up, take a few photographs to document exactly where they sit.
      2. Next, use a viewfinder or other compositional strategy to study your objects from different points of view and with different aspect ratios and cropping strategies. Make a series of small compositional sketches in your sketchbook based on the different view points. Decide which compositional sketch you find most compelling.
      3. Next, in your sketchbook, make individual value studies of each object by itself. Put a strong directional light on the objects and draw them one at a time, using a full range of value, from the darkest to lightest on the value scale.
      4. Next, switch to your large 18 x 24″ drawing pad. Create a frame within which to work that matches the aspect ratio of your favorite compositional sketch (by frame I mean a light series of pencil lines that creates a border around the edge of your work, creating a gap between your drawing and the edge of the paper- see sample below)
      5. Working from your compositional sketch and from observation, start developing your drawing. Remember to start with light, general (diagrammatic) lines that describe the basic shapes and structures. Check yourself along the way with the sighting and measuring techniques we used in class.
      6. When you are satisfied with the basic placement of the objects, you can start adding more specific structural lines, and finally to value. Start with light values and gradually add layers until you’ve built up a rich range of values that includes the darkest darks and lightest lights on the value scale.

      Louis Lozowick, Breakfast, 1930, Lithograph (more info here)

      Lozowick

Week 2 Assignment #2

Homework

  1. Reading
    • John Berger: Drawing(PDF here)
    • Selections from The Critique Handbook (PDF here)
    • The Art of Responsive Drawing: Gesture (PDF here)
  2. Assignment #2: Room Panorama
      For this assignment you will be creating a panoramic contour drawing that depicts a 360 degree view of an enclosed space across several pieces of paper. Similar to a panoramic photo app you might run on your phone, you’ll be “stitching” several different views together. It’s fine if they don’t match up perfectly- they probably won’t! Do these drawings in black ballpoint pen on your 18 x 24″ drawing pad
    1. Choose an enclosed space to work in (this can be a room, like the drawing classroom, your bedroom, bathroom etc, or a courtyard or other outdoor area that is enclosed)
    2. Using your 18 x 24″ drawing pad, choose a position to start your drawing series. Create a contour drawing that takes in as much of the view in front of you as you can see comfortably without moving or straining. Try to scale your drawing so that it fills the whole page.
    3. When that drawing is complete, rotate 90 to 120 degrees in one direction, so that you have a new view that barely overlaps your previous view. Complete another contour drawing. It can be around the same scale and eye level, or varied if you’d like to create some tension in terms of perspective.
    4. Rotate one more time in the same direction, and complete a third contour drawing. If at this point your first drawing and your third drawing are overlapping, you’re done. If not, create another drawing (or partial drawing) to fill the gap.
    5. Bring the completed drawings to class next week, and we’ll assembled them into panoramas on the critique wall.
    6. Below are some examples of contour drawings and photo panoramas of rooms/enclosed spaces.

Egon Schiele, 1917:
Egon_Schiele_-_Alte_Giebelhäuser_in_Krumau_-_1917

Egon Schiele, Self Portrait as St. Sebastian, 1914-15
self-portrait-as-st-sebastian-1914

Photographic Panorama:
Panorama-Room
Photographic Panorama:
pano5-living-room1a

From the website of Dan Nott:
30-sunderland-room2-jpg_wm

From the website of Brenda Swenson:
Studio-contour

Week 1: Assignment #1

Homework

  1. Purchase supplies! For class next week, bring sketchbook, vine charcoal, woodless pencils, ballpoint pen or $2 to buy one from me, xacto blade or utility knife. No erasers necessary!
  2. Optional but encouraged: Email me an image (or 2 or 3) of a drawing(s) your made that you’re happy with in some way or another, either from Intro to Drawing or something you did on your own (cc Laura!). This will help me get a sense of everyone’s interests/level. Please include your name and “Intermediate Drawing- Past Drawings” in the subject line.
  3. Assignment #1: Found Drawings:
    1. With a camera in hand (cell phone is fine), wander the streets in your neighborhood. Walk for at least thirty minutes, looking carefully. If you can, try to walk with no destination, just explore and try to really see the landscape you’re walking through. Maybe take route you wouldn’t usually take.
    2. As you walk, look for drawings in the landscape. These can be intentional drawings made by a human (like tagging, street art, signage etc), or unintentional drawings created by the environment as a result of some other activity (like cracks in a sidewalk that look like lines, rust stains that create forms, power lines that divide space in an interesting fashion)…anything is fair game.
    3. Use your camera to document the “drawings” you see. Keep composition in mind. How are you framing the “drawing” to create an image that is interesting to look at?
    4. When you’ve finished your walk, download your photos and review them. Email your favorite image to me. Include your name and “Intermediate Drawing: Assignment #1″ in the subject line.
    5. Come to class prepared to discuss why you selected your particular images, and how they relate to drawing as you understand it.

Expanded Still Life Artists

Still life is alive and well in contemporary art. Below are examples of work by several contemporary artists who draw on the aesthetics, tropes and traditions of the genre to make work that moves beyond a technical study or a pleasing picture.

Daniel Gordon (photography, sculpture, collage)
Gordon’s Show at the Hort
Gordon on Art 21

gordon_7

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Josephine Halvorson (Painting on site, from life, single session)
Halvorson at Sikkema Jenkins Gallery
Halvorson on Art 21

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Vik Muniz (Photography, large-scale installation using objects)
Muniz at Sikkema Jenkins
Wasteland documentary

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Mickalene Thomas (photography, painting with mixed media, portraits and still life)
Thomas at Lehmann Maupin Gallery
Thomas interviewed in Bomb Magazine

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Julie Heffernan (self portraits in oil)
Heffernan, Beer with a Painter
Heffernan in Art and America

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Heffernan_Self Portrait as Woman Recovering from Effects of Male Gaze

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Atmospheric Perspective Examples

Claude Lorraine

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Rembrandt
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Giorgio Morandi

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Art Supply Stores

Michael’s
www.michaels.com
808 Columbus Ave (btw 97th & 100th), New York

Artist and Craftsman
artistcraftsman.com
2108 7th Ave Adam Clayton Powell Blvd
New York, NY 10027

Blick
www.dickblick.com
1 Bond St # A
New York, NY 10012-2307
(212) 533-2444

650 6th Ave
New York City, NY 10011‎
(212) 524-9611

NY Central (Really great paper selection!)
www.nycentralart.com
62 Third Avenue
New York, NY 10003
212.473.7705

Extra Credit

Exhibitions and Events

One extra credit assignment is worth 10 points (equivalent to a single homework assignment). To receive points, attend one of the shows or events listed below. While there, sketch one work of art included in the show and take a photograph of the work or of yourself in front of the gallery or museum to show you were there. Write up your experience in ~300 words, describing the show in terms of your own reaction to it as well as anything you noticed that relates to techniques and concepts discussed in class. Email the write up, sketch and photo to me: ellie at ellieirons.com.

Through Dec 20 PPOW Gallery, Chelsea (Free, Tu-Sat)
Through Jan 11th Garden of Unearthly Delights, Japan Society, Midtown East ($10 students, Free Friday 6-9 pm)
Through January 9th Egon Schiele: Potraits, Neue Gallery, Upper East Side ($10 students, Free Fridays 6-8 pm)
Through Dec 14 Thread Lines, Drawing Center, Soho ($3)
Through Nov 16 Sari Dienes, The Drawing Center, Soho ($3)
Through Nov 26 Botanical Illustrators Annual, Horticultural Society, Chelsea (free, Tues-Sat)
Through Oct 2014 Natural Histories: 400 Years of Scientific Illustration, American Museum of Natural History (suggested admission, pay what you wish)
Through January 2015 The Animation Art of Chuck Jones, Museum of the Moving Image, 36-01 35th Avenue, Astoria, Queens
Through Nov 30th Willem van Genk: Mind Traffic, The American Folk Art Museum, Columbus Avenue between 65th and 66th Streets (free, closed Mondays)
Through 2015 The Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters’, MoMA, 53rd Street, Midtown (Free with CUNY ID)
Through 2015 Francesco Clemente: Inspired by India, Rubin Museum, West 17th St, Chelsea ($10 students, half price w/ a friend form here, closed Tuesdays)
Date Exhibition/event title, Gallery/Museum Name, location (price, hours)
Date Exhibition/event title, Gallery/Museum Name, location (price, hours)

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